Causes of Surface Cracking in Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement: Case study of Kagere Munyange-Njigari-Gituiga Road in Kenya

  • James N. Mwitari Mwitari Civil and Building Engineers Limited
  • James W. Kaluli 2Sustainable Materials Research and Technology Centre, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Charles K. Kabubo Sustainable Materials Research and Technology Centre, Jomo Kenyatta University of Agriculture and Technology

Abstract

Concrete pavements are expected to have a long structural life. The present study considered a jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP) road in Kenya that developed surface cracks within the first 2 years of construction. With a CBR of 10-17%, the subgrade layer was ruled out as a possible cause of cracking. However, the subbase layer did not meet the minimum CBR value, and 24% of the pavement did not attain the recommended minimum layer modulus value of 345 MPa for neat gravel construction. Furthermore, the concrete strength was below the design strength of 30KN/mm2. None of the saw-cut joints met the recommended depth and only 5% of the slabs met the design slab thickness. Inadequate slab thickness, inadequate depth of cut joints, and inadequate strength of subbase layer could have been responsible for the development of surface cracks. These  shortcomings should be interrogated further to establish the true combination of factors that were responsible for the cracking of the JPCP  Furthermore, there is need for a deliberate effort to assess the capacity and competencies of the construction industry in Kenya to handle new technologies in road construction. 
Published
Jul 25, 2017
How to Cite
N. MWITARI, James; W. KALULI, James; K. KABUBO, Charles. Causes of Surface Cracking in Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement: Case study of Kagere Munyange-Njigari-Gituiga Road in Kenya. JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE RESEARCH IN ENGINEERING, [S.l.], v. 3, n. 4, p. 94-104, july 2017. ISSN 2409-1243. Available at: <http://sri.jkuat.ac.ke/ojs/index.php/sri/article/view/565>. Date accessed: 23 nov. 2017.